Posts Tagged: Liberty of London

Give Me Liberty! Club

Liberty of London Tana Lawn is one of my favorite fabrics. It is lovely to touch and lovely to sew with. One of the drawbacks of Liberty is the high price tag of $34/yard, which makes some people hesitate before pulling that trigger. However, once you have sewn with it, I think you’ll find it’s a price that is worth the quality of the goods. We wanted a way to let people dip their toes into the beautiful pool of Liberty fabric, so we created a new club called Give Me Liberty! I mean, obviously I wasn’t going to let this club naming opportunity pass me by. ūüėČ

In this club you will receive a beautifully wrapped bundle of four Liberty fat eighths, which will be a half yard for each bundle. The shipments will go out on the 15th of every other month, starting in December (and then the following months of February, April, June, August, and October). If you sign up for the whole year at once, you will get a discount on each bundle. If you just want to sample a few months, you can sign up for the deliveries of those particular months, but won’t receive the full-year membership benefits. We will also have a few other gifts for the full-year members, including a free quilt pattern at the end of the club that you can use your entire Liberty stash for. That full stash will be THREE YARDS OF LIBERTY, in 24 different prints. These will be perfect for machine piecing or hand work, or use them for fun bits of color in your sewn wardrobe.

Here is the pricing breakdown:

Full-Year Member

$90 for 6-month subscription ($15 per bundle)
+ 6 Bundles of 4 Fat Eights of Liberty of London (24 total=3 yards!)
+ Pintuck & Purl’s “Give Me Liberty! Quilt” Pattern (released in September 2018)
+ Exclusive deals for club members
+ Special member swag

Monthly/Single Month

$17 Bundle Purchase
+ 1 Bundle of 4 Fat Eights of Liberty of London (4 total = 1/2 yard)

So, what are you waiting for?!?! Sign up today over in the online shop!!

 

 

Row by Row with Salty Oat

It’s that time of year again! Row by Row begins next week on June 21st, and we are ready! If you aren’t familiar with Row by Row, here is the scoop: participating quilt shops around the US (and some countries around the world) offer a quilt row pattern for free that they have created for every person that comes through the door. Each pattern is¬†created by the shops, so that no two¬†should be alike. If you have a competitive nature, you can put together eight different rows, and if you are the first one to bring in a finished quilt (pieced, quilted, bound and labeled) you have the¬†chance to win a prize of 25 fat quarters! Such fun!

We have teamed up again with Caitlin from Salty Oat, who has designed our row this year, and we are so excited! We thought we would take this opportunity to get to know a little bit more about Caitlin and her design process and have her tell us all about the row this year!

Can you tell us a bit about Salty Oat?
Salty Oat is a one-woman quilt business, which I run from my home studio in Framingham, MA. I sell both readymade and custom patchwork quilts, pillows, and a small line of hand embroidery patterns. I also teach both sewing and embroidery classes in the area.

How long have you been quilting?
I’ve sewn since childhood, but I began quilting in 2009. One of my first quilts was made from the fabric bunting we used as a decoration at our wedding.

What was your inspiration for this year’s row by row design?
When I was brainstorming ideas for the row based on the theme of “On the Go,” I kept coming back to the idea of tires and the infinite number of rim designs I see every time I’m driving on the highway. I thought it would be fun to create a somewhat abstract design based on tires by creating circles within circles, each of which is unique. I opted to use an improvisational framework for the construction of the blocks–each circle is cut by hand, hand-sewn, and placed at random in each block–so no two blocks are the same and no two rows will be the same. I also love how the random placement of the tires suggests movement across the row–perfect for this theme!

What drove your fabric choice?
Maggie has such a gorgeous selection of Liberty of London Tana Lawns in the shop, and I thought it would be fun to incorporate such special prints into the row. I love mixing different substrates into my work, and lawn is also a great fabric for hand sewing.

You chose hand appliqué for this year’s block, why?
Since this year’s theme is “On the Go,” I loved the idea of creating a row that you could sew while you’re actually on the go. Hand appliqu√© is super portable, and I love the idea of people working on this row throughout the summer, taking blocks with them to the beach or the pool, or while traveling in cars or planes.

Do you have any tips or advice for putting together this block?
Enjoy it and take your time! The construction of this block will require you to slow down a bit, as is the nature of hand sewing. Also, embrace the imperfections of hand sewing and be patient with yourself. I guarantee you’ll see your skills improve as you work¬†your way down the row!

Thanks, Caitlin! We are super excited about this year’s row and we can’t wait to share it with you!

Photo of Caitlin by Linsey Hite

Grainline Lark Tee in Liberty Knit

Remember when I said I had another Lark Tee¬†to show off? Well, here it is! This tee¬†is one of my favorite makes¬†and gets heavy rotation in my wardrobe due the¬†amazing fabric. We were fortunate enough to get a small cut of this Liberty Wiltshire rayon ¬†jersey¬†last year and when we cut the last piece for a customer, a small half to two-thirds of a yard was left. It was pretty small and I was unsure what I was going to use it for, but I was NOT going to let it go to waste. It went into my small (yet ever-growing) pile of hoarded fabric and sat for a few months. I finally decided that I could squeeze a Lark out of it, if I did the cap sleeves. And, so…my shirt was born.

I didn’t do anything different this time around with the pattern, except for using the¬†cap sleeves. As I mentioned last time, I could have (and probably should have) shortened it, but I didn’t. It’s still fine, but next time around I will shorten it. I have my eye on a few knits that we have that will shortly make their way into my stash.

This rayon jersey was a bit slinkier than my last shirt and I did need to exercise a little more care with it during certain steps. It was prone to excessive shifting during the¬†cutting stage, so to combat this,¬†I did not¬†cut the back or front on the¬†fold, but instead opened the fabric¬†out into a single layer and matched up the center front/back. I also had to really play around with my stitch length for¬†the twin needle until I found a look I liked when finishing the neckline and hem. I don’t remember having so much trouble with my last one. It might be¬†possible that since this was Liberty, I was being a bit fussier than normal. Haha!

I’ve said it before, and it bears repeating: ¬†if you are looking for a great introduction to knit sewing patterns and wear t-shirts all the time, this pattern is amazing. Four different necklines plus four sleeves equals endless sewing and wearing enjoyment!

I also want to point out that this post will mark the¬†end of my pink hair. You can probably tell that some of my posts were in a crazy order, since my hair went from brown, to magenta, to pale pink, back to brown with regularity. Those who have visited the store know that I had the pink for quite awhile, but that is all gone now. I loved having it, but the upkeep was a bit much at the end.¬†Our backlog of photos and posts have now been exhausted and we are back to our regularly scheduled hair color. At least for now. ūüėČ

So…have you sewn the Lark yet? Have you ever sewn with Liberty knit? Does your hair match your shirt?? Do tell! ūüôā

All Photos by Ashley Shea Photography

Liberty Sureau

I know it is just after Christmas, and the temperature here in New Hampshire is nowhere near being able to wear this now, but I am still posting this today. Let’s say it will bring us back to the warm, yet crisp days of fall before we settle in for the¬†dark winter. This is the Deer and Doe Sureau. It is a two piece¬†dress with a faux placket and the¬†options for sleeves or not. I choose not. It has been awhile since this pattern’s heyday, but I have to say, I¬†understand why it enjoyed such popularity when it was first released. Because of the faux placket and simple construction, once I had worked out my own fitting tweaks (and jumped over the¬†pocket hurdle), this dress was a pretty quick and satisfying make.

The skirt is gathered, which normally I am not a huge fan of, but figured I would give it a go. Looking at the photos, maybe I need to give gathered waists another chance! I am quite smitten with this dress on me. Who knew?!?!

Liberty Sureau by Pintuck & Purl

As far as fitting, I did some research before embarking on this pattern. I had seen around the interwebs that people had trouble with a gaping neckline. I whipped up a quick muslin of the¬†bodice after performing my usual sba (small bust adjustment‚ÄĒsince D&D is drafted for a C-cup) and sway back adjustment, and tried it on. After seeing the¬†results I took a 1/4″ wedge out of the front neckline tapering to nothing at the waist. It seemed to work well enough. I might have been able to take out more, but I didn’t want to go overboard.

The only other thing that I didn’t personally love was the¬†neckline facing. I am usually not on Team Facing, ever. I would prefer binding or lining my garments. Since this was the¬†first time making this I figured I would play by the rules. The facing extends around the¬†whole neckline, which is then topstitched down. Once I attached the¬†facing, I wanted a cleaner look so I handstitched it down. Even with the¬†handstitching, I find that it is still a bit fussy. Apparently I¬†will¬†never join Team Facing. I find them fiddly and annoying. Give me bias binding any day.

Liberty Sureau by Pintuck & Purl

The one other thing I did was add pockets. Actually, let me rephrase that. I added “a pocket”. This dress has a side zipper. I had every intention of cutting the dress so that I could move the zipper to the back, but absolutely forgot when cutting. I figured that I could just add them into the side seam. If you have been reading this blog, or know me ¬†at all, you know that most of my makes are right before a particular deadline. This dress was no different, trying to get it done for Maker’s Days in September. Since I was in a time crunch, I did not think through my construction of the zipper-sided pocket. Needless to say, when I sewed it up, I only had one functioning pocket. Yes. I had sewn the other one shut while attaching the invisible zipper. I decided then and there that I only needed one pocket. And that was that.

For this dress, since it was to be for a special occasion (Maker’s Days was our one year anniversary celebration!) I decided to go big for the fabric. What is the top of the line for me? Liberty of London. If you have never heard of this company, you should get to know it. It is an old-school London based store-front (it’s an actual department store) that has (and has¬†had for over 125 years) their own line of fabric. Their style is tight florals or designs that lean on a vintage-nouveau feel. Sometimes even a Where’s Waldo look, in a really cool and pretty way. Their Tana Lawn (which is what I used here) is¬†a beautifully soft cotton that is a dream to sew with and to wear. It is not an inexpensive fabric, but worth every penny.

Liberty Sureau by Pintuck & Purl

All Photos by Ashley Shea Photography

Should I make this again, and I really want to try the sleeved version, I have a few things that I would change. I would move the zipper to the back and add two pockets, and change the facing to bias binding or line the bodice instead. Anything to keep me away from those facings.

Deer and Doe Sureau

The pattern itself is well drafted and I do love the look of the dress. This is only the second Deer & Doe pattern that I have sewn, but I love the fit and style of my Belladone dress, so I am assuming that we are a pretty good match. I will tell you that the pattern directions are still a bit on the sparse side (similar to the Belladone), but there is enough there to get you to a new dress. I would suggested this to a beginner who has at least one other garment pattern under their belt. If you are looking to start your first dress in 2017, this would be a great pattern!

Have you sewn the Sureau? Are you on Team Facing or with me on Team Never-Facings? Do you have big sewing plans for 2017?? Come on, tell us!